QuizPedia

Assessment is central to the process of teaching and learning. It is used to monitor the learning processes and to ascertain achievement in each area of the curriculum. In previous posts I have looked at digital applications that can be used in the assessment process and I recently came across a new tool called QuizPedia that I have started to use in the classroom.

QuizPedia is an online quiz creation resource similar to Kahoot! and Quizizz, but with a few interesting differences as well.  QuizPedia markets itself as being designed primarily for students to create quizzes. It is also designed with mobile users in mind.  While you can absolutely do everything you’d want to do from a desktop or laptop, it’s great to see an educational app designed with phones and tablets in mind as well, which is also perfect for BYOD classrooms.

Each quiz can have as many questions as you want, and you can choose to randomize the questions if you’d like to as well.  You also have the option of having the questions  in a poll format, with no right answer. One great feature in QuizPedia is that both questions and answers can be images. I think this can be incredibly beneficial across a wide range of class levels and subject areas.  Allowing students to select image responses opens up a door to lots of exciting possibilities at all age levels.

Once your quiz is finished and you close out of it, you’ll be able to see quite a few options, like editing, deleting, copying, embedding and sharing.  If you’re going to embed it, you can actually get the embed code and place it on another site, which is something that is rarely available in other quiz creation apps. You also have the ability to change the state of the quiz if you’d like to set it to only be active for a certain amount of time, or make it only visible to certain people as well.

QuizPedia has potential, particularly if you’re looking for an application that gives students the opportunity to create fun quizzes for their peers. Having students create a quiz for their peers is a very useful activity. In order to create their own multi-modal quizzes students must be able to research, evaluate and validate information and they must distill their knowledge down to a few key questions. This forces them to reflect about the subject from different angles. What do I know about this? What is most important? How do I best present my knowledge to my peers? The process they go through to create
the quiz is in itself a valuable learning and consolidating activity.

QuizPedia however is not only for students. Teachers can also benefit from using quizzes to diversify their teaching.

When your school has a QuizPedia subscription you can tag your quiz with subject areas or key words. This makes the quiz part of a quiz library for teachers where other teachers also share their quizzes. This way you don’t necessarily have to reinvent the wheel every time you need a quiz about something and you can also copy or adapt quizzes made by others.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *